Tag: politics

Disheartened by the protests

Given the continuous flow of bad news re the Trump administration and Congress, I understand why many of my friends were encouraged by the women’s marches. Me though…I am not feeling so encouraged.

 

Reading about the protests, I thought about the large numbers of Americans who voted for Trump and the Republicans in this past election. I wondered: how did the protests and related photos and media coverage look to them? Did the protests spark any reconsideration of their support? Doubtless many of these voters are die-hard Republican voters – and efforts to mobilize them, to persuade them to join the opposition will bear no fruit. But what about the more ‘marginal voters’? What about Peggy Sue in Iowa who voted for Trump with reservations? Or her cousin, Bobby Joe in Wisconsin who votes sometimes for Democrats and sometimes for Republican candidates, but went with the Republican candidates in this election?

 

There are many issues upon which Trump and co. should be opposed; yet the protests manifested a highly culture-focused opposition. Will this focus appeal to the many voters who weren’t sufficiently put off by the cultural elements of Trump’s campaign?  Think of the  many white women who heard Trumps disrespectful comments regarding women, yet still voted for him.

 

I realize that the opposition will not consist of protests only – and protests naturally tend toward cultural issues. But, I fear the protests signaled the likely focus and tone of their future efforts. And, it’s hard to imagine the Trump opposition will appeal very much to Peggy Sue or Bobby Joe unless they broaden their topical focus and dial down the shriller voices on issues like abortion.

 

Most Americans have mixed feelings regarding policies toward abortion; yet, the protests gave the impression that those who lead the opposition to Trump will tolerate no constraints on access to abortion. In fact, they won’t tolerate people who feel differently on this point. NB. March leaders blocked participation by pro-life women’s groups.  An opposition that appeals only to the relatively small proportion of Americans who hold these views on abortion-related policies is unlikely to persuade Peggy Sue or her cousin to cross over.

 

Our country’s social gains re racism, homophobia and the like are precious. Perhaps Americans are taking these gains too much for granted; we clearly need to be vigilant. Yet, I do worry that Peggy Sue and Bobby Joe may not be mobilized by an opposition movement that puts combatting racism (and other -isms) at the top of their agenda.

 

Please understand, this is not a statement of my positions, or preference orderings. I’m pondering the possible appeal of these positions to hypothetical people who live well outside the coastal-cultural-elite bubble in which I reside. I’d love to hear what others think – whether they dwell inside or outside the bubble 😉

 

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